Texas

Registered voters in Texas need to confirm their identity with photo ID when they vote in person.

If you don’t have an acceptable photo ID, there may be other ways you can confirm your identity.

Is out-of-state ID accepted?

No!
You cannot use an ID issued by another state.

Is student ID accepted?

No!
You cannot use an ID issued as a student ID.

Is an expired ID accepted?

Sometimes!
You can use a photo ID that is expired up to 4 years (or more than 4 years if you are 70 years or older). See below for more information.

COVID-19 Update

Some Texas counties are sending mail ballot applications to registered voters. To find out if you will be receiving a ballot application, check with your local election officials.

Texas ID Requirements for Voting In Person

ACCEPTABLE PHOTO IDS 

You can cast a regular ballot if you present one of the following IDs. Must be unexpired or expired up to 4 years. ID can be expired more than 4 years if you are 70 years or older:

  • Texas Driver’s License
  • Texas Personal ID Card
  • Texas Election ID Certificate
  • Handgun License
  • Military ID Card
  • US Passport
  • US Citizenship Certificate (does not expire)
If you do not have one of the IDs listed above, you can cast a regular ballot if you present a supporting form of ID:
  • Voter registration certificate, or
  • Certified US (including territory) birth certificate, or
  • Current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck (must show your name and ANY address) or
  • Government check (must show your name and ANY address) or
  • Any other government document showing your name and ANY address (examples: an out-of-state license, a government employee ID)

AND

  • Complete and sign “Reasonable Impediment Declaration”

Important note: An election officer is not permitted to question the reasonableness of your impediment to getting an ID.

Frequently Asked Questions

If you are a registered voter and do not have a photo ID that is acceptable for voting, you may apply for a free Texas Election ID Certificate.

 

To qualify for an Election ID Certificate, you must:

  • Provide documentation to verify your US Citizenship
  • Provide documentation to verify your identity
  • Be eligible to vote in Texas (provide a valid voter registration card or submit a voter registration application)
  • Be a Texas resident
  • Be 17 years and 10 months or older

Find more details about how to apply for an Election ID Certificate.

VoteRiders can help you apply for a free ID and secure any documents that you need. Get free help now!

A reasonable impediment is a valid reason that is beyond your control and creates an obstacle to getting an acceptable photo ID.

In Texas, that includes: lack of transportation, lack of birth certificate (or other necessary documents) , disability or illness, conflict with your work schedule, family responsibilities, acceptable ID lost or stolen, you have applied for an acceptable form of photo ID but have not yet received it.

Important note: An election officer is not permitted to question the reasonableness of your impediment to getting an ID. For example: If you check “lacks transportation” on your Reasonable Impediment Declaration, the poll worker should not challenge your access to a bus route or other transportation.

To vote under the reasonable impediment exception:

  • Bring a supporting ID with you. (See acceptable forms of ID listed above)
  • Tell the poll worker that you don’t have a photo ID and could not get one.
  • Complete and sign a Reasonable Impediment Declaration
  • Vote a regular ballot
If you are a registered voter and don’t bring an acceptable ID, you may cast a provisional ballot.

In order for your ballot to count, you must appear at your county voter registrar’s office within six calendar days after the election and present:

  • Acceptable ID
  • Supporting form of ID
  • Execute a Reasonable Impediment Declaration OR qualify for an exemption

Review the in-person requirements for the list of acceptable and supporting forms of ID.

Get in touch with VoteRiders if you have questions or need free help getting ID.

You do not need a “REAL ID” to vote in Texas.

Your driver’s license or state ID card will show a gold star if it meets REAL ID requirements under federal law. You may commonly hear it referred to as a “gold star” or “star” ID.

Texas issues only REAL ID-compliant driver’s licenses and state IDs.

If you need to renew your state photo ID or driver’s license (or apply for a new one) you must go through the REAL ID process.

Texas REAL ID info

Get in touch with VoteRiders if you have questions or need free help securing ID.

Texas ID Requirements for Voting By Mail

Only certain voters are eligible to vote absentee in Texas.

If you are a first-time voter and you did not provide either your Texas driver license number or Social Security number on your voter registration form, you need to include a copy of the photo ID with your application (people with disabilities are exempt.)

Some Texas counties are sending absentee ballot applications to registered voters. To find out if you will be receiving a ballot application, check with your local election officials.

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Any registered Texas voter is eligible to vote absentee if one of the following applies:

  • You will be away from your county on Election Day and during early voting hours
  • You are sick or have a disability
  • You will be 65 years of age or older on Election Day
  • You are confined in jail, but eligible to vote

No ID is required with your ballot request if you have voted in Texas before.

If you are a first-time voter and you did not provide either your Texas driver license number or Social Security number on your voter registration form, you will need to include a copy of photo ID with your application (people with disabilities are exempt).

Learn more about federal ID requirements for first-time voters.

If you need a copy and don’t have the means to print one: Get free help printing a copy of your ID

The signature on your mail-in ballot must match your signature on file with the state.